Partnerships

Jewish Community Center and Federation

Last Night Ballyhoo posterThe Last Night of Ballyhoo and Behind the Gates were produced in partnership with the Tampa Jewish Community Center and Federation, who hosted private opening night performances, which included postshow forums with scholars, clergy, social issues advocates, and members of the cast and crew. The panel and audience explored issues in the play such as women’s roles in conservative religion, abuse in fundamentalist / orthodox communities, the politics of Israel, adoption, parenting, anti-semitism in the south, growing up Jewish in any setting where they were the minority, how things have and haven’t changed and so on.

Behind the Gates posterWe hosted additional talkbacks through the runs, which included the cast and producing artistic director exploring similar themes as the opening night talks, but much of the discussion focused on religious identity and the many universal elements of religion from cultural to spiritual practice that are similar, if not the same, despite the particular faith one ascribes to. These were diverse meetings, where many different kinds of people were able to come together and use theater as a means by which to get at deeper issues.

The Spring & Amnesty International

Closetland posterIn 2012, we partnered with Amnesty International for our production of Closetland, including a drive for books, toiletries, and clothes to help stock the updated facility at The Spring, a domestic violence and prevention agency.

Mineola Twins posterIn 2004, we used the run of The Mineola Twins to raise awareness and funds for The Spring, as well as to drive for food for Metropolitan Ministries. A talkback took place with both students and general audience to discuss feminism, alternative sexualities and how both have been informed by the decades panning from the ’50s to present time. Additional insight was provided about playwright Paula Vogel and general theater creation practices.

American Cancer Society

Our Job-side Project of tick, tick … BOOM! raised money for the American Cancer Society. Above the hard costs of producing the show, all proceeds were sent back to the ACS.

Metropolitan Ministries

Devil poster 2008In 2008, we used the run of The History of the Devil, which took place between Halloween and Thanksgiving, to do a food drive for Metropolitan Ministries, a local food bank that serves Tampa Bay, in anticipation for their busiest and neediest time of the year. Three barrels of non-perishable items were delivered back to the local food bank.

We Wont Pay posterIn 2006, we used our entire run of We Won’t Pay! We Won’t Pay! to do a food drive for Metropolitan Ministries. We also helped raise awareness for the group by showing a brief video on the window monitors outside the theater prior to the show and inserting informational brochures into our programs for the run.

U.S. Armed Forces & The Poynter Institute

Embedded posterOur mainstage production of Embedded was used to do a food and supply drive for our brave fighting men and women in Iraq and Afghanistan. We provided specific items not readily accessible to those units as requested by them personally.

Jobsite was honored with a flag that was flown during Operation Black River.

Also during Embedded we held a talkback with members of the media and the Poynter Institute to discuss ethics in war coverage. All proceeds from that performance benefitted the Poynter Institute’s scholarship fund.

9/11 Widows and Children FundTampa Firefighters Museum

Guys posterIn 2002, we produced Anne Nelson’s 9/11 play The Guys in the Jaeb Theater as a fundraiser for the 9/11 Widows and Children Fund.

As a five-year commemoration of 9/11, we reproduced The Guys in 2006 as a fundraiser for both the Tampa Firefighters Museum and the 9/11 Widows and Children Fund. In addition we performed this show for free at two local high schools.

All proceeds for our productions of The Guys above the hard costs were donated to these charities.

Numerous talkbacks have taken place for the various incarnations of this production – for firefighters, general audience members and students. These talkbacks focused on the healing process in the face of great tragedy, the show itself and insight into theatrical production.

HARC

Boys-Next-Door-Poster02We partnered with Hillsborough Alliance for Retarded Citizens (HARC) for our production of The Boys Next Door. The cast and crew met with HARC residents and participated in activities for several months leading up to the production.

The run helped raise awareness and funds for this important community organization. This partnership culminated in a special performance of the play for an audience of HARC residents.

Two talkbacks occurred with both general audience and students to enlighten audiences on the subject matter of the play, discuss HARC’s activities in the community and provide general insight into theatrical production.

Part of Jobsite’s mission is to inspire our community to not just be consumers, but true citizens. One way of doing that is through working with groups and charities in conjunction with our productions, so that the community has a chance to get involved, while these organizations hopefully not only get some assistance, but needed exposure.

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Get in touch with Artistic Director David M. Jenkins for all business and production related questions and touring information.

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