Our 2017-18 season opener, The Flick, took place in a movie theater. Movie buffs are very familiar with sneak previews and special midnight showings of films in advance of their “official” opening. Studios like these to start drumming up excitement about the film and to get that word of mouth machine going in advance of a film’s opening weekend (yanno, because opening week box office is sort of a big deal).

With live theater previews are not quite the same thing, but in a way they sort of are.

Live theater isn’t like a movie in the respect that a movie doesn’t change if someone is watching it or not. All the “work” has been done by the time it shows up at your local AMC or Muvico. Live theater is much different because live theater is a dynamic, emergent thing that truly only comes to life once the show’s last piece is in place — and that’s you, the audience.

An audience dictates more than you might think. There are reasons we crave the energy of a full house, or when it’s not full why we prefer to have the front of the theater full and not everyone sitting in the back, or why it drives us nuts to see people on their phones the whole time or carrying on a conversation — an audience is PART OF the live theater experience for everyone, including the actors and others watching the show. The timing of a joke or a moment of suspense can only be perfected in front of real people. When a light or sound cue might occur because of a reaction in the house can similarly also only be made just right by having real-time reactions. How an actor plays this moment or that hangs on the reciprocal energy provided by their scene partners, and that includes the audience. We do not truly know what we have in a show until we have who we’re doing it for.  We might think a moment is super effective, but of course we do if we’ve been staring at it for a month and know what it was supposed to do. An audience might walk in and not get it at all, or not find this thing funny at all, or be moved by another moment in any way. For a show like The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged) [revised] there is an even bigger reason live bodies matter — because the actors spend a whole lot of time talking and interacting directly with them. There’s only so many times we can play pretend before we need real people.

We take in all of the lessons learned during previews. The actors, designers, and technicians stay after those preview performances to talk about it. We make adjustments. Previews are still rehearsals for us, but with an audience. This is also why we don’t invite the local critics or the Theatre Tampa Bay judges to previews. We’re still working!

Now, most of the time these changes are just tweaks, Making a good thing better. Sometimes they are a bit more drastic. During previews we are also still in the process of putting finishing touches on things. Perhaps there is still a bit more detail paint here or set dressing to go up there that a preview audience won’t see. Maybe a costume is lacking a final bit of trim or an accessory. Perhaps a sound or lighting cue gets changed.

And, of course, previews are opportunities for the cast and crew to get gain confidence in front of people. Not because we’re actually scared, it’s just that we never know what we have until others see it and react. That’s always exciting AND terrifying. Usually after two previews, we know what we’re in for and what needs to be done to make a good thing better.

Where it is like the movie sneak preview is that we, too, hope audiences walk away talking the show up and get that word of mouth machine clicking.

Our previews start at just $18, quite a bargain for tickets that otherwise start at $29.50. You’re doing us a favor by being part of the process and we’re giving you a huge break on tickets for being a “test audience.”

If you’re a fan of the bargain we offer on previews, we’ve also started selling a pass to them that makes them only $13 each with no extra charges, but it comes with some restrictions not placed on our regular season pass. Take a look.

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